CPP1 WK2: Nomenclature - Curriculum, Pedagogy and Practice


Required Reading
  • Churchill (text) Chapter 1.

Further reading (articles available on e-reserve and books in the library short loan)
NB: Further reading help you in developing a deeper and more complex understanding of the issues we are exploring. As such they are not required reading. You are encouraged to engage with the further reading according to your interests and study time. Being week 2 I imagine you will be getting your head around the course so even less likely to have a look at these. Once settled into the course I would expect you to look at at least one of the further readings each week.
  • Text Chapter 6 & 8 - we will be dipping in and out of these two chapters over the coming weeks.
  • Hattie J. (2003). Teachers make a difference: What is the research evidence? Paper presented at Australian Council for Education Research Conference, Melbourne, 1921 October
  • Ewing, R. (2010). ' 'Curriculum as Content and /or Process?' Curriculum and Assessment: A Narrative Approach. Melbourne : Oxford University Press. Chapter 3
  • Webster, R. S. (2009). Why educators should bring an end to pedagogy. The Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 34(1), 42-53.
  • Yates, Lyn( 2009) 'From curriculum to pedagogy and back again: knowledge, the person and the changing world', Pedagogy, Culture & Society, 17: 1, 17 — 28


Overview

'...because teachers were once students in compulsory education, their sense of the teachers world is strangely established before they begin learning to teach. We enter teacher education with our school biography. Teaching is one of the few professions where newcomers feel the force of their own history of learning as if it telegraphs relevancy to their work.'(Britzman 2003 p.1)
'How a person learns a particular set of knowledge and skills, and the situation in which a person learns, become a fundamental part of what is learned.'(Putnam & Borko, 2000)
'There is, though, an invisible element in learning to teach that the received wisdom does not mention. The sociologist Dan Lortie pointed out over twenty years ago that teachers go through a lengthy apprenticeship of observation in that they spend their entire childhoods observing teachers teach. Lortie sug- gested that the endurance of traditional teaching practice derives in part from the fact that teachers are highly likely to teach in the way they themselves were taught.’ Their experiences in primary and secondary schools give them ideas about what school subject matter is like, how students are supposed to act in school, and how teachers are supposed to act in school. Thus, when they begin to teach, they adopt the practices of their former teachers.'(Kennedy 1999 p.55)
'If we teach today's students as we taught yesterday's, we rob our children of tomorrow.'(John Dewey 1859-1952)

It is well established in educational research that teachers often teach the way they were taught, regardless of the way they trained to teach. In many respects it is understandable as the early years of the profession are often busy as teachers adjust to their new career. Amongst this general busyness it is easy to retreat to the familiar, to what one spent 13 years absorbing. However, this trend often means that we inadvertently reproduce the inequities and ineffective approaches of the past. Many Pre-service teachers find this idea confronting, after all schooling was generally successful for them so why imply anything is wrong. To answer this question we need to consider the statistics on educational achievement (both here and overseas) which tell us that not everyone achieves in education, and that this achievement is strongly correlated with social background. Furthermore, as a university qualification prospective teachers have generally been amongst those that achieve in schools. The end result is that the views of important knowledge, relationships to knowledge, ways of interacting, and approaches to learning are often a product of this experience. If we are to disrupt the perennial patters of underachievement we need to re-think our approaches to education and teaching.

This is not to say everything is 'bad': It is however a call to think critically through the experiences that have formed our impressions of schooling and attempt to separate the good from the not so good. This is where pre-service teacher education as an academic discipline comes in. As an academic study with a developed research base it aims to encourage teachers to break with the reproductive logic that prevails, however as noted above this has not always been successful. In 'SecED@UC' we are exploring what we believe is an approach that achieves this - a strong focus on research informed practice, the use of the course provocations and pedagogical reasoning. This unit, Curriculum Pedagogy and Practice 1, focuses upon planning. However this necessitates developing an understanding of what we are planning to teach and why, the influences on how we teach and an understanding of the research on effective teaching. This is then related to the subject specific context in the there KLA workshops that have a focus on the practicalities of preparing for your first professional experience placement.

Finally there are a couple of warnings. Firstly like any area of research some educational research is influenced by ideology. Thus, like most disciplines, for one research report claiming a solid conclusion there will be another claiming an opposite outcome. To overcome this I advocate a critical reading of the research, it's methods, constructions and the ideology informing it. Secondly, there is often a disjuncture between the public discourse on schooling, 'quality' / effective teaching, and curriculum, and the conclusions of academic research. To deal with this I again ask that you consider these discourses, and academic research, critically and come to your own informed conclusions.

Teaching is a great profession. No two days are the same, there is always a challenge. The rewards are great - nothing matches the feeling of seeing a student 'get it' or having a student stop you in the street 10 years later and tell you how you changed their life. However with this comes responsibility, the future is literally in your hands.

This weeks Lecture


Echo 360 recordings
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS SHOULD LISTEN ONLY TO THE LAST HALF OF THE RECORDING
Rich media
Vodcast
Podcast
Course Portal
Podcast RSS
Vodcast RSS

& (NB - rough notes only)

Investigate.jpg

For you to Investigate

After this week's tutorial I would like you to post your reflections on the ideas of curriculum, pedagogy and practice in one of the various discussion sites (your blog, the discussion forum, ning, or elsewhere).


some excerpts from the further readingl

Write in whichever forum you are comfortable with, or personally if you prefer.

Use the assumptions surfaced during today's discussion and your reading of the text and the further reading to date.

Task 1: Write some initial thoughts in relation to the characteristics you hope to emulate in your career and those you hope to avoid.

Task 2: Write an initial interpretation of the terms curriculum, pedagogy and practice.

Task 3: Discuss the relationship between your initial assumptions and the research literature, note similarities and differences.


This weeks tutorial




View it on VoiceThread

This week we will be using a (modified) jigsaw method to explore our own backgrounds and preconceptions of teaching, and then using these to explore the concepts of curriculum, pedagogy and practice.

G Version:
  1. We'll start with a short exercise to help us reflect on the lecture and 'zone in' for the tutorial
  2. The first activity will see us working in small 'community' groups of about 5-6 where we will discuss the characteristics of teachers and teaching we found both effective and non-effective in our own schooling.
  3. We will then form 'tute' groups of about 25 or so to look for common ideas of both effective and non-effective teaching / teachers.
  4. We will then quickly whip around and get an idea of each from each group, while another member of the group notes the ideas on the wall. Dissenting judgements from the group will also be heard.
  5. The second activity will see these existing groups of about 25 divide into 4. These 4 new groups will reform as 'expert' groups (i.e all the 1's together, all the 2's and so on), that will consider some excerpts from the further reading above. The idea is that members of these groups become experts in what they have considered. These expert groups then consider their topic in relation to the findings about opinions on effective and non-effective teaching / teachers.
  6. The 'tute' groups now reform with each 'expert' teaching the rest of the tute group what they have found out. (there will be more than one expert per group).
  7. quickly whip around and get an idea of each from each group, while another member of the group notes the ideas on the wall. Dissenting judgements from the group will also be heard.
  8. At the end of the day after Meg's section we will have personal time to reflect on how todays work links to assignment one and what tips you should take away for your first prac / career.

Post Tutorial Reflection:

some excerpts from the further readingl

Write in whichever forum you are comfortable with, or personally if you prefer.
Use the assumptions surfaced during today's discussion and your reading of the text and the further reading to date.
Task 1: Write some initial thoughts in relation to the characteristics you hope to emulate in your career and those you hope to avoid.
Task 2: Write an initial interpretation of the terms curriculum, pedagogy and practice.
Task 3: Discuss the relationship between your initial assumptions and the research literature, note similarities and differences.

UG Version:
  • We pick up from last week and join the above task at step 5.
  • Step 8 will happen at the end of the tutorial.

References for quotations above:
  • Britzman, Deborah P (2003). Practice makes practice: a critical study of learning to teach (Rev. ed). State University of New York Press, Albany
  • Putnam, R. T., & Borko, H. (2000). What Do New Views of Knowledge and Thinking Have to Say About Research on Teacher Learning? Educational Researcher, 29(1), 4-15.
  • Kennedy, M. M. (1999). The role of preservice teacher education. In Darling-Hammond, L. and Sykes, G. Teaching as the Learning Profession: Handbook of Teaching and Policy (pages 54-86). San Francisco: Jossey Bass.