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9
Lecture, face-to-face
Cybersafety and cyberbullying
Drop-in tech demo
The Le@rning Federation; Visual media; educational games, avatars, and virtual worlds



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Lecture


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FilmIcon.pngInnocuous farmyard words

WARNING! This video might be a bit crass or 'off colour' for some, so be warned.
If you do choose to go ahead and watch it, though, it might give you a laugh about the number of porn sites on the web. Obviously the BBC doesn't have Content Keeper on their system.




FilmIcon.pngBringing up cyberkids
This is an interview I did with Melanie Dancer, mother of two cyberkids and former member of the Pedophile Task Force with the South Australia Police. You should watch it.




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Video. Do you wanna date my avatar?








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Preparation for this tute


Print out the Tute Package PDF if you want. It's got the tute prep, study guides, and tute format info all in the one, handy doc. I haven't done any formatting on it though, so it looks a bit daggy. But better than nothing.

1. Read and think about the following resources -- they're not massive and not difficult, but hopefully thought-provoking. There is a study guide for each reading further down this page. If you don't have time to read each resource, then at least read the study guides -- the study guides are designed to help you if you're time-poor. These resources are available on E-reserve for this unit
  • Shariff, S. (2008). Chapter 5. Controlling kids' spaces. In Cyber-bullying. Issues and solutions for the school, the classroom and the home. London: Routledge.
    This is a very important resource. You should make the time to read the whole thing. It is in the 'Essential' folder in e-Reserve.
    View the Shariff study guide
  • Juvonen, Jaana and Elisheva F Gross. 2008. Extending the School Grounds? Bullying Experiences in Cyberspace. The Journal of School Health. Sep 2008, vol. 78, Iss 9, Research Library pg. 496.
    View the Juvonen and Gross study guide

2. Review the following case studies. You might want to refer to these two case studies in your tutorial discussions.
CASE STUDY 1
Chris Webster on the site Cyberbullying.info recounts the story of Ghyslain Razaa, aka ‘the Star Wars Kid’:

"Ghyslain became an internet sensation in May 2003 when four classmates discovered a private video of him pretending to be a Jedi Knight. Rather than laughing at the video in the privacy of their homes, the classmates decided to upload the video to the internet. Within weeks it had been seen by millions. … While the world laughs, and spin-offs are created at an average of one per day, Ghyslain and his parents don't find the situation very funny. The parents have filed a lawsuit against the classmates that uploaded the video. The lawsuit is accompanied by instant messaging transcripts, in which the classmates gloat over their success. Ghyslain was forced to drop out of high school, and finished the year at a faculty specialising in child psychiatry."

Consider the ethical and moral questions raised by this case. Some of the questions below are phrased in a deliberately provocative or ambiguous manner.
  • Is this a case of cyberbullying? If so, why? If not, why not?
  • In making the video should Razaa have realised that it might ‘get out’ there and just accept the consequences?
  • Does his age matter?
  • Does Razaa just need to ‘toughen up’?
  • What about the role of his parents?
  • Where do a person’s feelings come into it?
  • Do you think Razaa’s classmates knew what they were doing? If not, does this make them ‘less responsible’ for what happened?
  • Do you think Razaa might have already been the target of bullying at school?
  • Should Razaa be grateful for his internet fame and try to make money out of it?
  • What role should the school and its teachers have played (if any) in this situation?
  • In viewing the Star Wars Kid video are you contributing to his humiliation? Are you a bully, too, if you watch it? What if you watch it but don’t laugh?

I leave it up to you to decide whether or not you want to track down and view the video for yourself.

CASE STUDY 2
Visit Wikipedia and read the entry on Rebecca Black. In 2011, thirteen-year-old Black’s music video ‘Friday’ was uploaded to YouTube. Black’s parents paid ARK Music Factory to write the song produce the video. The video went viral as ‘the worst song ever recorded’ and attracted tens of millions of views and comments. Most comments were negative and many were vitriolic, hostile, and even threatening (along the lines of ‘If I saw you, I would cross the street and kill you’, and ‘I want to bash you for making this song’). Black has also reportedly received death threats via email and phone and was bullied at school after the release of the video (see the Wikipedia entry). Black has gone on to achieve a moderate level of mainstream success.

Consider the ethical and moral questions raised by this case. Some of the questions below are phrased in a deliberately provocative or ambiguous manner.
  • Why the huge backlash? Was it ‘just’ about the song, or is it because people think Black is a spoilt rich kid?
  • If you put yourself ‘out there’ should you expect this kind of reaction?
  • Does Black deserve her public pillorying?
  • What was the role of Black’s parents in all of this?
  • Did she ‘have it coming’ to her?
  • Does Black’s age matter?
  • Does her subsequent celebrity, success, fame/infamy impact on how you see this case?
  • What role should the school and its teachers have played (if any) in this situation?


TutorialIcon2.pngTutorial


Print out the Tute Package PDF if you want. It's got the tute prep, study guides, and tute format info all in the one, handy doc. I haven't done any formatting on it though, so it looks a bit daggy. But better than nothing.

This tutorial is brought to you by the following provocations:
  • To whom am I accountable?
  • What will students want and need from me?
  • How will I control my students?

This tute is structured so that you
  • Articulate your personal opinions, beliefs, and experiences regarding the topic of technology, society, and education
  • Consider others' opinions, beliefs, and experiences regarding the topic
  • Search for commonalities regarding the topic
  • Identify legitimate issues that affect schools in relation to the topic
  • Bring rigour to your thinking around the topic
  • Build your knowledge and understanding of the topic

Meg will 'float' between groups to answer questions, clarify things, whatever.




Tute structure

2.45 pm (5 mins): Meg to introduce structure of session

2.50 pm (0 mins): Settle upon some people to fill the following roles:
  • Time-keeper (one for each group you form). You know what your job is ;)
  • Facilitator (4 needed, 1 for each consulting group). You will need to 1) facilitate a large 'consulting group' conversation (up to 30 people), 2) report back on that conversation to the whole community (all the grad dips), and then 3) lead the final discussion in your consulting group.
  • Scribe (4 needed, 1 for each consulting group). You will tweet the large 'consulting group' conversation. Yes, interesting use of the term 'scribe', I know. Your hashtag will be #inspireteal, #inspireflexi, #inspirestudio1, or #inspirestudio2, depending on your location. This doesn't mean that others in the group can't tweet your room, just that the scribe has set responsibility for doing so.

2.50 pm (30 mins): Form a home group of 5 - 6 people
Share your personal opinions and experiences (if you have any) regarding cybersafety and cyberbullying. You should also want to refer to lectures, the readings, and resources on this page, or anything else you find useful. The questions below can be used to guide your discussion. You'll soon see that the questions are deliberately provocative and value-laden. Don't forget to appoint a time-keeper.
  • Why is cyberspace so dangerous?
  • How can we control kids online?
  • Are the social conventions of cyberspace different?
  • Is bullying online worse?
  • How much should teachers know about cybersafety?
  • Is cyberbullying a teacher's resonsibility?
  • Do some kids deserve it and just need to toughen up?

3.20 pm (30 mins): Merge your home groups into 4 large 'consulting' groups.
Facilitator, scribe, and time-keeper needed
You should be located in the following places:
  • The TEAL room (#inspireteal)
  • The flexi space (#inspireflexi)
  • Studio 1 (#inspirestudio1)
  • Studio 2 (#inspirestudio2)

Look for common ideas and themes regarding technology, society, and education. Don't forget to appoint a time-keeper.
  • At this stage, you should identify what are the 3 or 4 key areas of cybersafety and cyberbullying that need addressing, discussing, further investigation, or further understanding.
  • Try to get some agreement, but where there is disagreement, record the 'dissenting opinions'.
  • Appoint a facilitator to keep control of the discussion and to report back to the other consulting groups.
  • Appoint a 'scribe' to tweet your conversation. Your hashtag will be #inspireteal, #inspireflexi, #inspirestudio1, or #inspirestudio2, depending on your location.

3.50 pm (30 mins): Break your consulting groups up into expert groups of 4 people -- no more, no less, OK? ;)
Your task is to brief your (admittedly, imagined) school principal on staff and student needs as regards issues relating to cybersafety and cyberbullying. The idea here is that you act as 'experts' in what you have considered, basing your brief on evidence and informed opinion as opposed to personal opinion (e.g., 'The internet is too dangerous: kids should be locked out of it' and 'Hey, it's fun! Open house, everyone!'). 'Dissenting judgements' are still allowed, but they need to be backed by evidence and argument as opposed to unsubstantiated belief. Don't forget to appoint a time-keeper.

In particular, your briefing points might include:
  • Current issues (e.g., kids' ability to access the internet during school; how to identify cyberbullying amongst students; how to talk to your class about cybersafety and cyberbullying; parental vs school responsibility)
  • Current shortfalls and strengths of the school system that impact on these issues
  • Potential stumbling blocks and ways around them
  • Final recommendations (aim for at least 3)

Tip: Use the discussion from your consulting groups as well as references to resources (any proper, scholarly literature you have looked at would be great!) to inform your brief.

4.20 pm (25 mins): Expert groups report back to the community group and share your briefing points
Each expert group will give an overview of its briefing, including recommendations. It will be interesting to see what you've come up with! Everyone in the TEAL Room.

4.45 pm (15 mins): Personal reflection time
  • What can use from today's tute in Assignment 1?
  • What I can use in to inform my teaching practice?
  • How will I use this in my prac?
  • Start building your '10 tips' for new teachers. Reflecting on what you've learnt today, write down any 'tips' you might give to beginning teachers. By the end of the semester, you should have a consolidated list of your 'top 10 tips'.


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Study guide: Shariff (2009)

Shariff, S. (2008). Chapter 5. Controlling kids' spaces. In Cyber-bullying. Issues and solutions for the school, the classroom and the home. London: Routledge.

This is a very important resource. You should make the time to read the whole thing. It is in the 'Essential' folder in e-Reserve.

This resource is available on E-Reserve for this unit.
  • Shariff examines how cyberspaces are different from physical spaces as regards bullying phenomena and also as regards how adults and children share and understand these spaces (or not). It is this latter, she says, that characterises what cyberbullying debates are all about (112).
  • Schools, she points out, usually have "physical dividers of authority" (113) but such dividers aren't as easily demarcated in cyberspace. She also states that "anti-authority forms of online expression post a threat to the control that teachers had heretofore exercised over students" (130).
  • Picking up from boyd's work, Shariff points out that when physical space is heavily controlled, young people attempt to map out spaces for themselves in other realms -- in this case, in cyberspace, which is seen as a "play space away from adults. They see it as empowering and liberating, and it comes as a shock when they are discovered and punished [for poor behaviour]" (121).
  • Shariff also questions teachers' and schools' own attitudes and behaviours towards students as part of her thesis that, "in some cases where teachers have been cyber-libelled ... there may be underlying frustrations on the part of the student that have not been addressed by the teacher" (123). Quid pro quo.
  • Shariff points out that "virtual spaces are extremely different from physical ones, and as such they generate a new set of social conventions among youths" (124 - 5). Arguably we are still working out what these conventions are, and Shariff bemoans the fact that too often people focus on technology as if it can be divorced from its socio-cultural contexts (128). That makes me sad, too.


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Study guide: Juvonen and Gross (2008)

Juvonen, Jaana and Elisheva F Gross. 2008. Extending the School Grounds? Bullying Experiences in Cyberspace. The Journal of School Health. Sep 2008, vol. 78, Iss 9, Research Library pg. 496.

This resource is available on E-Reserve for this unit.

A fairly extensive study (1400 students), but getting a bit old now. Still, I think this piece has some useful things to tell us. Read only the intro and discussion if you’re running short of time.
  • external image cyberbullying.jpg
    external image cyberbullying.jpg
    Juvonen and Gross describe cyberbullying as “pervasive intimidation” (497).
  • They argue that sample characteristics and the types of technologies examined” account for the methodological inconsistencies across studies (497).
  • A really, really important point is this: ” … these data do not tell us whether youth experience cyberbullying mainly through these particular communications tools or whether their usage pattern merely reflects risky online behaviour” (497)
  • Skip to page 502 and look over the findings. In brief, they are: 1) cyberbullying is a common experience for heavy users of the internet, 2) there is a lot of overlap between online and in-school bullying, 3) the devices are merely tools used for cyberbullying, not the causes of mean behaviour, 4) all bullying is associated with increased distress, 5) youth rarely tell adults about online bullying, and tend not to use the tools to prevent further incidents.


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external image tlflogo1.jpg?w=510Tech demo drop-in: The Le@rning Federation

As a University of Canberra student you are able to access 8,900 items of digital curriculum content through The Le@rning Federation’s e-content repository. You can sort learning objects by subject area, content type (e.g., video, audio, document), year levels and more. This is a fantastic resource to draw on, so I strongly suggest you register.

You will need to use your university email address as your username, provide some basic information and establish a password. A confirmation email will be sent to validate registration.



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Tech demo drop-in: Visual media

See Visual media on the Using Social Media in the Classroom website

Here are some animations made by previous Grad Dip students










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external image avatar.jpgTech demo drop-in: Educational games, avatars, and virtual worlds

See Educational games on the Using Social Media in the Classroom website
What makes an effective game? Can you use games in your own classroom? How would you use them? What problems might you encounter? How can they add value? There are stacks of games and rich content out there for you to access. You can check out some of the links below but you might just want to google the topic.

PS: The image at left is from Jason’s mind. You probably don’t want to visit there. But you might want to see Hitler’s reaction to news that the Avatar trailer isn’t much chop if you’re procrastinating (there’s a strong language warning attached to it, though). If you’ve been paying attention, you’ll know that it’s been a ‘thing’ on YouTube to take a certain scene from Downfall (with Bruno Ganz as Hitler) and to re-mix it with humorous subtitles. Ah, popular culture … Downfall is very good, btw.























IconBooks.PNGFurther reading: Cybersafety and cyberbullying

This reading is not compulsory. It is provided for extension only. Many, but not all, of these resources are available on E-reserve for this unit.

Byron, T. (2008). Safer children in a digital world. The report of the Byron Review. Available at http://www.education.gov.uk/ukccis/about/a0076277/the-byron-reviews. Accessed 1 November 2011.

de Zwart, M., Lindsay, D., Henderson, M., & Phillips. M. (2011). Teenagers, legal risks and social networking sites. Faculty of Education, Monash University, Melbourne. Available at http://newmediaresearch.educ.monash.edu.au/moodle/course/view.php?id=37. Accessed 13 October 2011.

Hinduja, S., & Patchin, J. (2010). Cyberbullying prevention, and response. Cyberbullying Research Centre. Available at http://www.cyberbullying.us/resources.php. Accessed 18 October 2011.

Juvonen, J., & Gross, E. F. (2008). Extending the school grounds? Bullying experiences in cyberspace. The Journal of School Health 78 (9), 496 – 505.

Shariff, S. (2008). Cyber-bullying. Issues and solutions for the school, the classroom and the home. London: Routledge.


IconBooks.PNGFurther reading: Visual media

This reading is not compulsory. It is provided for extension only. Many, but not all, of these resources are available on E-reserve for this unit.

Connolly, S. (2011). The New Addington primary schools animation project: Using animation to build community relationships between schools. Journal of Assistive Technologies 5 (1), 37 – 9.

Davies, J. (2007). Display, identity and the everyday: Self-presentation through online image sharing. Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education 28 (4), 549-564.

Levin, S. (2010). Student created videos. Teaching copyright and media literacy through student-produced documentaries. Knowledge Quest 38 (4), 52 – 55.

Lindgren, S. (2011). YouTube gunmen? Mapping participatory media discourse on school shooting videos. Media, Culture & Society 33 (1), 123 – 136.

Mullen, R., & Wedwick, L. (2008). Avoiding the digital abyss: Getting started in the classroom with YouTube, digital stories, and blogs. Clearing House: A Journal of Educational Strategies, Issues and Ideas 82 (2), 66 – 69.

Nov, O., Naaman, M., & Ye, C. (2010). Analysis of participation in an online photo-sharing community: A multidimensional perspective. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 61 (3), 555 – 566.

Rule, L. (2010). Digital storytelling: Never has storytelling been so easy or so powerful. Knowledge Quest 38 (4), 56 – 57.


IconBooks.PNGFurther reading: Educational games and avatars

This reading is not compulsory. It is provided for extension only. Many, but not all, of these resources are available on E-reserve for this unit.

Habgood, M. P. J., & Ainsworth, S. E. (2011). Motivating children to learn effectively: Exploring the value of intrinsic integration in educational games. Journal of the Learning Sciences 20 (2), 169 – 206.

Hew, K. F., & Cheung, W. S. (2010). Use of three-dimensional (3-D) immersive virtual worlds in K-12 and higher education settings: A review of the research. British Journal of Educational Technology 41 (1), 33 – 55.

Mallan, K. M., Foth, M., Greenaway, R., & Young, G. T. (2010). Serious playground: using Second Life to engage high school students in urban planning. Journal of Learning, Media and Technology 35 (2), 203 – 225.

Ulicsak, M., & Williamson, B. (2010). Computer games and learning. A Futurelab handbook. Available at http://www.futurelab.org.uk/resources/computer-games-and-learning-handbook. Accessed 1 November 2011.