Week 11

All units

You have to make some form of contribution to the Grad Dip Fair for the Tuesday tutorial timeslot. Get together with some mates to run a 'stall' or workshop or gig ... Visit the Fair wikipage for ideas.

Ed Foundations



CPP 1



CPP 2



ELPC G1 (Grad Dips only)




Week 10

Ed Foundations

1. IQ tests

Find out for yourself how IQ tests work.
Take the tests at the following 3 sites:
http://www.intelligencetest.com/
http://www.queendom.com/tests/access_page/index.htm?idRegTest=1127
http://www.queendom.com/tests/access_page/index.htm?idRegTest=1112
a) Think and compare the theoretical approaches to intelligence in the 3 tests.
b) Which test best represents your view of intelligence? Why?
c) What is the usefulness of such tests in the school setting?

2. Video study

Helping 'at-risk' students:
Watch the videoclip above, which shows a school’s approach to helping at risk students in the areas of teaching, behaviour management, and building relationship.
a) Record the strategies that you think can be effective in your future classroom(s);
b) Use the educational psychology theories you have learnt so far to analyse the basis of these strategies; and
c) Discuss why you think these strategies may be effective.

3. Research on teaching exceptional students and inclusive education

Read the literature on teaching exceptional students and find out more for yourself about the challenges and benefits inclusive classroom education.
You may choose to:
a) focus on one or some physical and/or intellectual disabilities and the unique issues they present for teaching and students' schooling;
b) read about the philosophy and Australian policies and socio-political contexts in providing for students with special needs; or
c) read about providing for gifted and talented individuals.
Search databases such as ERIC, PsycINFO, Australian Education Index and EdNA Online using terms like 'early intervention', 'integration', 'inclusion', 'disability', 'mainstreaming', 'learning difficulties', 'gifted education', 'ASD', 'vision impairment', etc.
Discuss your findings and informed views on Moodle.

CPP 1

Investigate.jpg

For you to Investigate

Remember, these tasks are to help focus your own study and reflections. I do not require them to be posted etc, but encourage you to share and discuss them if you wish. I'm also more than happy if you want to integrate your reflections with your other units.


CPP 2

Some suggestions for your writing
A. The lecture: What did you take away from the lecture? What thoughts or feelings did it stimulate?

B. Your reading: What did you take away from the readings? What thoughts or feelings did they stimulate?

C. You're all working on Assignment 2 at the moment. Given that collaborations are so stimulating/helpful for many of us, feel free to post some thoughts about your Assignment 2. Reading each others' could well be useful.
Some questions you might like to address in a post (either on Moodle or the Ning):
  1. What event(s) have you decided to use?
  2. In what way has this event unsettled or stimulated you?
  3. What Provocation are you going to foreground?
  4. What material from CPP 2 are you going to use to inform your analysis of this event?
  5. How's progress? Challenges?

ELPC G1 (Grad Dips only)

n/a

Week 9

Ed Foundations



CPP 1

Investigate.jpg

For you to Investigate
Remember, these tasks are to help focus your own study and reflections. I do not require them to be posted etc, but encourage you to share and discuss them if you wish. I'm also more than happy if you want to integrate your reflections with your other units.

1. Describe the key ideas of the 'pedagogy of poverty'.
2. Discuss how the notion of 'quality' in the QTM differs from a broader view of educational quality.
3. Consider how complexity is incorporated in your developing educational philosophy.
4. Have a look at assessment 2b and Raegina's sample material, and start working on yours.

CPP 2

Week 9: The walled city
The premise of this week’s work is this: that some classroom management issues stem from student frustration, with some students feeling trapped or excluded in some way.
I have three blog posts about a secondary boy I interviewed a few years ago. It tells the story of how he felt trapped, and how he got himself out of the trap.
Your tasks for this week:
  1. Read the blog posts. (This is your online lecture for this week.) The walled city: Josh Part 1, Doubts and loves: Josh Part 2, Walking through the barrier: Josh Part 3
  2. Think (and write) about times when you’ve felt trapped or excluded from the learning, and whether you found (or were helped to find) an escape route.
  3. Think about the reading and reflecting you’ve already done in CPP 2, and what light it might throw on this issue.
  4. Reflect on the implications of all of this for your teaching.

ELPC G1 (Grad Dips only)

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Preparation for this tute
1. Read and think about the following resources -- they're not massive and not difficult, but hopefully thought-provoking. There is a study guide for each reading further down this page. If you don't have time to read each resource, then at least read the study guides -- the study guides are designed to help you if you're time-poor. These resources are available on E-reserve for this unit

  • Shariff, S. (2008). Chapter 5. Controlling kids' spaces. In Cyber-bullying. Issues and solutions for the school, the classroom and the home. London: Routledge.
    This is a very important resource. You should make the time to read the whole thing.
    View the Shariff study guide
  • Juvonen, Jaana and Elisheva F Gross. 2008. Extending the School Grounds? Bullying Experiences in Cyberspace. The Journal of School Health. Sep 2008, vol. 78, Iss 9, Research Library pg. 496.
    View the Juvonen and Gross study guide

2. Review the following case studies. You might want to refer to these two case studies in your tutorial discussions.

CASE STUDY 1
Chris Webster on the site Cyberbullying.info recounts the story of Ghyslain Razaa, aka ‘the Star Wars Kid’:

"Ghyslain became an internet sensation in May 2003 when four classmates discovered a private video of him pretending to be a Jedi Knight. Rather than laughing at the video in the privacy of their homes, the classmates decided to upload the video to the internet. Within weeks it had been seen by millions. … While the world laughs, and spin-offs are created at an average of one per day, Ghyslain and his parents don't find the situation very funny. The parents have filed a lawsuit against the classmates that uploaded the video. The lawsuit is accompanied by instant messaging transcripts, in which the classmates gloat over their success. Ghyslain was forced to drop out of high school, and finished the year at a faculty specialising in child psychiatry."

Consider the ethical and moral questions raised by this case. Some of the questions below are phrased in a deliberately provocative or ambiguous manner.
  • Is this a case of cyberbullying? If so, why? If not, why not?
  • In making the video should Razaa have realised that it might ‘get out’ there and just accept the consequences?
  • Does his age matter?
  • Does Razaa just need to ‘toughen up’?
  • What about the role of his parents?
  • Where do a person’s feelings come into it?
  • Do you think Razaa’s classmates knew what they were doing? If not, does this make them ‘less responsible’ for what happened?
  • Do you think Razaa might have already been the target of bullying at school?
  • Should Razaa be grateful for his internet fame and try to make money out of it?
  • What role should the school and its teachers have played (if any) in this situation?
  • In viewing the Star Wars Kid video are you contributing to his humiliation? Are you a bully, too, if you watch it? What if you watch it but don’t laugh?

I leave it up to you to decide whether or not you want to track down and view the video for yourself.

CASE STUDY 2
Visit Wikipedia and read the entry on Rebecca Black. In 2011, thirteen-year-old Black’s music video ‘Friday’ was uploaded to YouTube. Black’s parents paid ARK Music Factory to write the song and produce the video. The video went viral as ‘the worst song ever recorded’ and attracted tens of millions of views and comments. Most comments were negative and many were vitriolic, hostile, and even threatening (along the lines of ‘If I saw you, I would cross the street and kill you’, and ‘I want to bash you for making this song’). Black has also reportedly received death threats via email and phone and was bullied at school after the release of the video (see the Wikipedia entry). Black has gone on to achieve a moderate level of mainstream success.

Consider the ethical and moral questions raised by this case. Some of the questions below are phrased in a deliberately provocative or ambiguous manner.
  • Why the huge backlash? Was it ‘just’ about the song, or is it because people think Black is a spoilt rich kid?
  • If you put yourself ‘out there’ should you expect this kind of reaction?
  • Does Black deserve her public pillorying?
  • What was the role of Black’s parents in all of this?
  • Did she ‘have it coming’ to her?
  • Does Black’s age matter?
  • Does her subsequent celebrity, success, fame/infamy impact on how you see this case?
  • What role should the school and its teachers have played (if any) in this situation?



Week 7

Ed Foundations

Complete one of the tasks below. You may choose one that is more aligned with your thinking in Assignment 2.

1) A case study: Dayna's story.

The case study is presented in this week's lecture. A copy of it is also loaded on Moodle. Respond to the question, 'What would be the most helpful thing that the school and the science teacher could do for Dayna?'

2) A Job interview question

You are at an interview for a job at a school with a large number of students from lower socio-economic backgrounds. The principal asks, ‘At our school, some of our students live in troubled and sometimes abusive family environments, some others are from refugee or new immigrant families with financial difficulties. Considering the problems these students experience in their lives, how will you engage them in their studies of English / maths / science / music / PE / ...?’

3) What does passionate teaching look like?

Right from the start of this course, we have often identified passion as a characteristic of effective and inspiring teachers. But what does passion in teaching look like? In her oral last Friday, Muriel asked the questions, (I can't remember you exact words and hope you don't mind me quoting you here, Muriel) 'What is passionate teachin?'. 'In teaching French, is jumping up and down, at times speaking with a shaky voice, and raving about France and her cheeses enough?'
In relation to our thinking here, watch a videoclip from Teachers' TV Australia and respond to the question, 'What does passionate teaching involve exactly in classroom practice?'.
[Note: The website does not permit downloading or embedding the videoclip. To watch the video, visit www.teacherstv.com.au; then go to 'Browse Library', click on 'Secondary' and then 'English'. The videoclip is entitled, 'Inspirations: a lesson from the best'. You will also need to register with the website to be able to play the video but with the rich video resources on the site, I think it'll be worth it.]

4) Learning theories: summary and comparison

By this week, we will have covered behaviourist, cognitivist and humanist theories of learning and their implications for education. Briefly summarise the theories, principles and assumptions. Compare their implications for teaching.

CPP 1

Investigate.jpg

For you to Investigate
Remember, these tasks are to help focus your own study and reflections. I do not require them to be posted etc, but encourage you to share and discuss them if you wish. I'm also more than happy if you want to integrate your reflections with your other units.

1. Considering what you have read to date, on a big bit of paper draw a diagram to illustrate how you plan for a lesson.
2. Read over the HIdden Pedagogy, while they are all important, which ones surprised you the most? why?
3. What do I mean by 'QTM is really all about students while simultaneously looking at the features of a teachers pedagogy'?
4. Plan to visit your school!

CPP 2

Either on Moodle or on the Ning, choose something to write about. Here are some suggestions.
  1. report on your exploration of Alfie Kohn’s thinking, or the thinking of another writer (chosen by you from the CPP 2 e-Reserve) about classroom management.
  2. Reflect on your own experience of community, where you felt a strong sense of belonging to a community, and where you didn’t. Is there a link between this and your behavior within that community?
  3. In the lecture, Steve talks about ways of fostering community. Which of these do you want to be a part of your teaching repertoire? What do you need to do to develop the necessary skills?
  4. Phil has published a wonderful list of tips for preservice teachers going into their classes for prac. It's called The Hidden Pedagogy. Read the list and write a post which explores the connection between Phil's list and the fostering of a sense of community.
  5. Have another look at Courtney's post 'How to rescue an English lesson ..'. To what extent is Courtney's success the result of her ability to create a sense of community? What community-building skills does she have?

ELPC G1 (Grad Dips only)

n/a


Week 6


Ed Foundations

Task of the week
1) You are being interviewed for a job in a school with students of a wide range of ethnicities and cultural backgrounds. The principal asks: 'How would you teach abstract concepts to a student who just arrived in the country and can't speak or read much in English?'
Prepare a response that is informed by educational theories which may or may not be constructivism. Illustrate your response with a concrete example of a particular abstract concept in your discipline and how you would teach it.

2) Provide a response to either of the questions based on the videoclips above.

CPP 1

Investigate.jpg

For you to Investigate
Remember, these tasks are to help focus your own study and reflections. I do not require them to be posted etc, but encourage you to share and discuss them if you wish. I'm also more than happy if you want to integrate your reflections with your other units.

1. If you haven't already contact your professional experience school - you'll need a few days observations to do assignment 2.
2. Have a look at the Pedagogical Reasoning Reading Guide and start thinking about it, just a little though.
3. redo 2.
4. If you haven't already get on the wiki discussion forum and peruse the discussions about what we teach, how we teach it, the equity implications and the impact upon our assumptions - all these discussion are fantastic articulations of ideas behind what we have been covering.
5. Go for a long walk, ride, whatever and just think about some of the ideas and approaches we have covered thus far.

CPP 2

You're going to be flat out with Assignment 1 this week, so there are no extra set reading or writing tasks.
But if any of you want to post a response to the online lecture, then do so either on my blog, on the Ning, or on Moodle (I'll create a spot called Week 6 Writing Task on Ning and Moodle for this purpose).


ELPC G1 (Grad Dips only)

IconSpanner.PNG1. Read and think about the following resources -- they're not massive and not difficult, but hopefully thought-provoking. There is a study guide for each reading further down this page. If you don't have time to read each resource, then at least read the study guides -- the study guides are designed to help you if you're time-poor. These resources are available on E-reserve for this unit



2. Listen to Young people online: Are we messing with their minds? available via Radio National's Big Ideas program (50 mins). Here's the blurb:
"Many parents say they're worried about what their children might be doing on the internet. A panel of researchers and mental health experts put their concerns into perspective. Highlights from Are we messing with their minds? A forum presented by the Cooperative Research Centre for Young People, Technology and Wellbeing."




Week 5

Ed Foundations

Task of the week
Complete one of the following tasks. It is recommended that you choose a task that is in alignment with your ongoing reflections about the 9 provocations and your assumptions of teaching.

1. Evaluate behaviourist techniques of instruction
In Tuesday's tutorial, you are to apply behaviourist principles of classroom instruction in conducting a micro-lesson. Based on your experience as a teacher or a student at the tutorial, reflect and evaluate the effectiveness and limitaions of behaviourist techniques to teaching.

2. Task analysis
One of the techniques in direct or explicit teaching is breaking down complex tasks into manageable steps / subskills for students to master one step / subskill at a time. Follow the examples in the lecture slides and complete a task analysis of a complex skill you may teach one day at secondary level. Afterwards, write about whether or not this exercise will help with your future lesson preparation. If yes, how?

3. Case study 1: Effective use of timeout
Visit the Moodle site of this unit and locate the PDF of this case study and evaluate the teacher, Jonathon's use of timeout in controlling a student's behaviour.
(Note: The PDF document is taken from the recommended text of this unit, Krause, et al. (2010). Out of copy right considerations, this document cannot be provided on this page here.)

4. Applied behavioural analysis
Applied behavioural analysis, or ANA, is a technique based on behaviourist learning principles aimed at changing academic or social behaviour. Focusing on observable and quantifiable behaviour, the instructor bases his/her intervention on observed changes.
Read the PDF describing the main steps in applied behavioural analysis on Moodle and, if necessary, locate other readings online on the topic. Will you be able to apply this technique in a future classroom or school playground situation? If yes, what type of situation and how may you apply the technique?
5. Lesson planning using the ASSURE model.Access a lesson plan at the following address:
ASSURE model of lesson plan

What are the characteristics of this lesson plan that distinguish it as an example of a behavioural approach to learning and instruction?

6. Case study 2: Explicit teaching
a) Watch the youtube video clip.
What aspects of the teaching do you appreciate? What aspects do you think you can change or improve for your disciplinary teaching?


b) Watch a second video clip on explicit instructions.How do you compare the teacher's practices with those of the teacher in the first video?


CPP 1

Investigate.jpg

For you to Investigate
Remember, these tasks are to help focus your own study and reflections. I do not require them to be posted etc, but encourage you to share and discuss them if you wish. I'm also more than happy if you want to integrate your reflections with your other units.

Don't feel compelled to master these ideas just yet. The aim is to introduce the concepts. As you learn more, observe in schools and experiment yourself on professional experience these ideas will start to develop further. Of particular importance is to not try to master QT and plan from a QT framework. You can not, and should not, try to cover it all all of the time. Instead it is a framework to provide a common language so that 'we' can talk about the elements of effective practice that you want to demonstrate over a series of lessons. Consequently, this week I want you to reflect in whatever manner works for you upon how PCK, TPACK & QTM can help you think about teaching your subject. If you are a Grad Dip you might want to also consider your lesson from last weeks tutorial in relation to the QTM.

CPP 2

CHOOSE FROM THE FOLLOWING ( Don't try to do them all. Choose what's going to be most useful for you in your development as a teacher.)
  1. Write a post in which you reflect on something from this week's readings, tutorial and/or lecture.
  2. Continue to work on your Assignment 1, and write a progress report.
  3. Continue to work on your Assignment 1, and write about a problem you're encountering. (Writing often helps unblock road blocks, or untangle tangles. So does any feedback you might receive on your writing.)
  4. Continue to read and take part in the many excellent discussions happening on the wiki and Ning.
  5. Read other people's Weekly Task posts on the Ning, and respond. (This really helps promote a sense of us all working together to further our learning.)


ELPC G1

Nil.




Week 4


Ed Foundations

Complete one of the following tasks which you find RELEVANT to your current course of thinking in relation to the 9 provocations:

1. Is positive thinking enough?
This television show for kids bills itself as “the latest kid’s show that builds self-esteem in children and creates confident kids.” Is it true that if you have trouble doing something, all you have to do is believe you can do it, and you can? Is this an effective way to help teach children about positive self-esteem? (Clips for class)



2. Understanding bullies and cyber bullying
Watch the 730 report on cyberbullying and write about these questions:
a) Research has shown that aggressive behaviour in students is often associated with low self-concept; and that bullies often do not have the socially valued ways to develop positive self-concept (Staub, 1999). How do you interpret this in relation to the fact that bullies are sometimes very popular among students?
b) With the development of modern technology and social media, bullying has taken on a more implicit nature, as opposed to the explicit bullying in the form of causing physical harm. How do you explain the inter-relationship between technology and implicit bullying?

Reference:
Staub, E. (1999) The roots of eveil: social conditions, culture, personality and basic human needs, Personality and Social Psychology Review, 3, pp.179-192.



3. The self according to Freud
This clip is an excerpt of an old educational film about Sigmund Freud's notion of the self as a triadic structure of the id, ego, and superego. Dramatising the Oedipus complex, the video shows an individual's sense of morality is shaped by their childhood experience of their parents' values.
What implications does Freud's psychoanalytic theory have for education in general and classroom instructions in particular?



4. Self-efficacy about teaching
Self-efficacy is a context-specific belief about one's own capacity. To understand one's self-efficacy, it is important to identify the fundamental aspects in your areas of strenghts as this will shed light on how your self-efficacy was originated and can be transferred to other areas of performance.
For example, if sports is the area where you have strong performance and high capacity, some of the core, deeper elements underlying good physical skills may include: good mind-body coordination; good self-awareness of the body and its movement; awareness of how the body interacts with the environment; and knowledge of how to build on the strengths and continue to develop in physical skills, that is, self-regulative and self-guided learning strategies.
The identification of the fundamental aspects is important because it provides a link between your stronger and weaker areas of performance.
Now think about this question, what are the fundamental aspects in good teaching (e.g., mastery of disciplinary content; self-reflection; social skills; public speaking, etc)? Are there connections between good teaching and an area in which you have high self-efficacy?

5. Social skills in learning
Design a cooperative learning activity for students in your curriculum area. What social skills are required for students to participate in this activity? How will you address the ncessary skill development for your students? Can you outline a set of 'social skills tips' for your students that explicitly explains and coaches the required interpersonal skills in cooperative learning?

CPP 1


Investigate.jpg

For you to Investigate G / UG
1. Describe how outcomes and objectives help structure learning in classrooms.
2. Explain how our understanding of curriculum, pedagogy and the purpose of education influence how we approach developing our lessons.
3. Discuss how 'big ideas' can help manage the relationship between what we personally think about education and the intent codified in state sylabus and curriculum documentation.
4. Evaluate the significance of the for / of distinction in how we approach assessment.
5. Explore your personal reaction to these ideas (objectives, outcomes, assessment of / for, big ideas) and how that reaction relates to both your beliefs about education and your experiences of education.

CPP 2

The lecture
Lecture this week is online, posted on my blog and titled The student revolt: online lecture for CPP 2 Week 4
When you go to this blog post, you'll discover that my lecture is made up of
  1. written commentary
  2. two videos (about 7 minutes each)
  3. ideas for writing, thinking and reading based on what you see, hear and read in the lecture.

Week 4 Tasks (for undergraduates and Dip Ed students)
You may have reading and writing plans that you're just wanting some time for. In that case, use this week to get on with these.
However, if you'd like more guidance or some prompts, I have embedded a number of these in the online lecture.
Please post on Moodle if you just want Steve to read your writing, and on the Ning (in your tutorial group) if you'd like your writing to be viewable by all. If you're doing your writing on a blog, please paste a link into one of these two places (Moodle or Ning).

ELPC G1

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Preparation for this tute
1. We strongly suggest you have a look at the tute plan for this tutorial. You'll see that the activities we'll be doing are quite structured.

2. In the tute, you will create a lesson on a topic you are passionate about: a hobby, pastime, a community issue you are involved with, whatever. Your lesson should last 25 minutes and you will be teaching to a maximum of 10 (ten) grad dip students. If you want/need to bring special gear or props to help you teach your lesson, then bring them along.

3. I'd really like you to read the resources ('readings') I've assembled for this week. If you are time-poor, then focus on the the Bayne podcast and at least read the study guides to get the 'big ideas'. You may want to use these readings as a basis for your lesson planning in the tute. The resources below are available on E-reserve for this unit.

Read/listen to the following before the tute. Think about some of the questions they raise: blog, tweet, write down, whatever your thoughts.



Week 3

Ed Foundations

Task of the week
Complete one of the following tasks:
1. Using toys and games as learning activities (p.132, O"Donnell, et al., 2012)
With your knowledge of Piaget's stages of cognitive development, make a trip to a toy store to examine the developmental appropriateness of the different toys/games on the shelves. Many toys/games will have a suggested age on the package label, but for this activity ignore the age recommendations of manufacturers and choose the level of cognitive development at which each toy/game is most approprate. Ask yourself questions such as: At what age would this toy/game be most interesting? Most fun?
Also examine which mental operations and cognitive skills are required to interact effectively with each toy/game. For instance, does this toy/game stretch and challenge the child's sorting skills? Classification skills? What about operations and knowledge, such as counting, matching, keepting time, vocabulary, labelling objects and pronouncing letters?
See whether you can find toys/games that would be most enjoyable for children of the following four ages: 1, 6, 10, and 15. Explain why.

Reference: O'Donnell, A. M., et al. (2012) Educational Psychology, Wiley, Queensland.

2. Lesson planning: using Piaget and Vygotsky
Design a lesson in your disciplinary area using both the 'developmental lesson model' and the 'workshop model' as described below. Examples of lesson planning using these models will be provided in the tutorial this week.
Comment on the elements (e.g., role of teacher; role of students / peers; role of language, etc.) in both models that may illustrate Piaget and Vygotsky's theories of development and education.
The developmental lesson Model
The developmental lesson model relies primarily on the teacher as the main source of information, if not by lecturing, then as the guide who elicits the information from students. Until recently, this was the predominant lesson format, and it still remains popular, particularly with veteran teachers. In this model, the teacher orchestrates the lesson from the chalkboard through a series of questions and discussions. The teacher typically controls the flow of the lesson and the pace of student learning. When done properly, this format can be effective and engaging for students. Students feel comfortable when they are led, step by step, through a difficult concept. Some teachers misinterpret their role in the presentation of the developmental lesson and simply lecture the students, providing them with little or no opportunity to discover or make meaningful contributions to the lesson.
The workshop model
In the student-centred workshop model, the teacher presents a lesson with four major components:
  • Connection to some previously learned concept;
  • An explicit statement of what is going to be taught and modeling it;
  • Active engagement that allows students to try it out during the lesson;
  • Provision of a link to independent or group work.
As the students work independently or in groups, the teacher circulates among them, providing guidance and encouragement. This is followed by a "share", with the teacher asking individuals or groups to report on their results. The teacher then restates these results to reinforce the aim of the lesson. (Adapted from Posamentier, A. S., Jaye, D., & Krulik, S., 2007)

Reference:
Posamentier, A. S., Jaye, D., & Krulik, S. (2007) Exemplary Practices for Secondary Math Teachers, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria.

3. What happens when students give a 'wrong' answer? -- Realising the meaning potentials in the seemingly 'wrong' or nonsensical speech of student
Design an interaction on a disciplinary concept / topic with an imagined student.
Picture a situation where the student gives an apparently wrong or illogical answer to your question. Instead of rejecting the answer, ask as many probing questions as necessary to solicit further expansions from the student so as to find out the specific associations the student has with the concept in question. Show the process you would go through so as to transform an incorrect response into a conceptually sound one.
Find a friend who is outside your professional area and put this imaged conversation to test. Reflect on what actually happened. Were you able to effectively listen and bring about change in your friend's understanding?

Instructions (for Grad. Dip. students only):
From Week 2 on, you have been given the option of completing 1 of several weekly tasks. From Week 3 on, in addition to completing your weekly task, you are also encouraged to read and comment on others' writings on Moodle or blog sites. From Week 3 on, I will relinquish the role of the sole feedback provider in our weekly writings. As the tasks get increasingly applied and discipline-based, reading and responding to others, particularly those in your subject areas, will no doubt be very beneficial for your own learning.
You are encouraged to provide feedback to others' tasks either on Moodle or your own blog space.

CPP 1

For you to investigate
1. Explore your relevant syllabus documents on the CPP 1 Week 3 page; just have a look around each.2. From the text readings.a. How can our pedagogies help promote more equitable social outcomes? should this be teachers work?b. Why might planning be important for effective teaching?3. Get to know your documentation using the below activities, you need to know a bit about how they look and what is in them for the CPP1 workshop. Take your time before then.

CPP 2

Reading
Continue your reading about classroom management. What you read is up to you (though see suggestions below). The only requirement is that you read, and, if you’re an undergraduate, that you report on your reading in your Wednesday tutorial.
Reading suggestions (Don’t do them all! Choose what’s going to help the most.)
  1. Use the following documents to help you find useful readings: Models_of_classroom_management.jpg, Guide_to_CPP_2_resources.png and Abstracts of e-Reserve articles Sheet1.pd.
  2. Here are some articles that are particularly relevant to this week's lecture and tutorial. Babkie 2006.pdf, Charles 2008a (Canters).pdf, Charles 2002.pdf, Charles 2005.pdf, Palmer 1997.pdf. (These are also on our e-Reserve list.)
  3. Steve has been writing about CPP 2 on his blog, called Degrees of Fiction
  4. Browse around the Ning. Read other people’s Week 2-3 posts, and other stuff you find interesting or useful.

Writing
Writing suggestions (Choose what’s going to help the most.)
  1. Write about what you've been reading. Write reflectively. 'This is what it's made me think about, or feel, or these are the memories it has triggered. These are the questions it raises for me, etc'
  2. Respond to the lecture.
  3. Respond to the 2012 Assessment 1 Rubric (Draft).pdf. You may find it useful to use these four headings: Clarify (what's not yet clear to me), Value (what I like about this rubric), Concern (what in this rubric causes me concerns), Suggest (how I can see the rubric might be improved).
  4. Reflect on, and critique, the tutorial (Tuesday afternoon for Grad Dips, Wednesdays for UGs). Did the format work for you? What teaching techniques are you picking up (or realizing you'll never use!:-)) through observing the way Steve organises his 'classroom'.
  5. Post online something that you began to work on during the tutorial time.
  6. Fill out Phil's HBDI questionnaire.pdf. Make sure you use EXACTLY 25 ticks. Notice, once you've finished, what your HBDI profile looks like. (Guess what Steve's profile looks like!)
  7. Respond to other student posts on Ning.

ELPC G1

There is no set work this week. Instead, use the time to consolidate/revise what we've already done in this unit, especially in terms of the tech stuff. This week gives you some 'breathing space'.

If you really, really want to do something, then perhaps jump ahead to the tech demo session notes for the week and get a sense of what we'll be covering.

Week 2

Ed Foundations

Task of the week
Note to students:
Each week, tasks are designed to elicit staged responses to the final assignments in the course. For Education Foundations, it is important that your writing and reflections are supported by relevant theories and research literature. You may think of your weekly writing as partial drafts of your assignments. That is, you are welcome to incorporate or reproduce your weekly reflections in your final assignments.

Choose and write about ONE of the following topics:
  1. Melissa has been reading about brain research, and decides to practice writing with her left hand to strengthen the right side of her brain, in hopes that it will help her with mathematics, which she has read is a ‘right brain’ activity. Does it work like this? How would you explain to her the implications of brain research?
  2. What are some other myths or misconceptions about brain development and functions that you are aware of? Based on the lecture, the video on the responsive brain and your reading in this week, do you now have a different understanding about the matter(s)? How do you think this will impact on classroom teaching and learning?
  3. How and when did you learn to read and write? What do you think is the best way to teach reading and writing? Should we focus mainly on skills, or on meanings in context, or is there another method?
  4. Reflect on a recent learning experience. How did it build on what you had known or experienced beforehand? List all the knowledge, skills and experiences that contributed to your learning. Are there other links you might have made to help you learn more, or learn more effectively?
  5. Describe a learning activity in a subject area in which you plan to teach. Show how the activity builds on prior learning and experiences. Identify the developmental skills or understandings students need to have to be able to complete the activity.

CPP 1

Required Reading
  • Churchill (text) Chapter 1.
Further reading (articles available on e-reserve and books in the library short loan)
NB: Further reading help you in developing a deeper and more complex understanding of the issues we are exploring. As such they are not required reading. You are encouraged to engage with the further reading according to your interests and study time. Being week 2 I imagine you will be getting your head around the course so even less likely to have a look at these. Once settled into the course I would expect you to look at at least one of the further readings each week.
  • Text Chapter 6 & 8 - we will be dipping in and out of these two chapters over the coming weeks.
  • Hattie J. (2003). Teachers make a difference: What is the research evidence? Paper presented at Australian Council for Education Research Conference, Melbourne, 19‐21 October
  • Ewing, R. (2010). ' 'Curriculum as Content and /or Process?' Curriculum and Assessment: A Narrative Approach. Melbourne : Oxford University Press. Chapter 3
  • Webster, R. S. (2009). Why educators should bring an end to pedagogy. The Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 34(1), 42-53.
  • Yates, Lyn( 2009) 'From curriculum to pedagogy and back again: knowledge, the person and the changing world', Pedagogy, Culture & Society, 17: 1, 17 — 28

CPP 2

The online lecture
Watch/read the online lecture Assignment 1: examining assumptions.

If you’re an undergraduate, make sure you do this before the Wednesday tutorial.

Reading
Continue your reading about classroom management. What you read is up to you (though see suggestions below). The only requirement is that you read, and, if you’re an undergraduate, that you report on your reading in your Wednesday tutorial.
Reading suggestions (Don’t do them all! Choose what’s going to help the most.)
  1. Look again at the Models Mindmap.
  2. Read pp 458-467 of the Krause article (it’s in the CPP 2 e-Reserve)
  3. Read Steve’s blogpost ‘Models of classroom management’.
  4. If you haven’t already, study these two documents: A guide to our reading resources and .
  5. Select a further article or articles from our CPP 2 e-Reserve to read.
  6. Browse around the Ning. Read other people’s Week 1 posts, and other stuff you find interesting or useful.

Writing
Writing suggestions (Choose what’s going to help the most.)
  1. After you’ve viewed/read the online lecture, respond in writing. What did you find yourself thinking about after watching/reading it? What did you take away from it?
  2. Steve talks, in his online lecture, about the way moments of crisis, frustration or challenge can help us think about our assumptions. Write about an incident you have recently experienced or observed with a student (in or out of school) that has challenged you. What assumptions did you bring to that experience or observation that were unsettled by what happened?
  3. Is there something you’ve read or heard this week that has stimulated your thinking about classroom management and about the kind of approach you want to take? If so, write about it.
  4. Look again at the Models of Classroom Management Mindmap.
  • Which of the models most matches the teacher you want to become?
  • Which of the models might offer you greater flexibility and effectiveness than you possess now?
  • What implications do your answers to these questions have for the way you're going about your reading?

ELPC G1

Preparation for this tute
  1. We strongly suggest you have a look at the tute plan (below) for this tutorial. You'll see that the activities we'll be doing are quite structured.
  2. Read and think about the following resources; they're not massive and not difficult, but hopefully thought-provoking. There is a study guide for each reading further down this page. If you don't have time to read each resource, then at least read the study guides -- the study guides are designed to help you if you're time-poor. These resources are available on E-reserve for this unit